Current state of .NET - through not-so-rose-colored glasses

Current state of .NET - through not-so-rose-colored glasses

Disclaimer: I'm writing these words just few days before the official release of Visual Studio 2017 RTM & about 2 months before the release of .NET Core 2.0. Hence you may find this post a bit pre-mature, but actually timing is on purpose - I'd like to make a stone-cold summary before all the marketing hype & another wave of rising hopes ... TL;DR .NET is ... lignifying. Not dying, retreating or drying out - simply lignifying. It's very solid & stout if you want to build upon it, but don't expect trunk of wood to behave like an evergreen…

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Five to midnight: what to expect of .NET Core 1.0 RTM

Five to midnight: what to expect of .NET Core 1.0 RTM

New .NET is around a corner. Tomorrow (2016.06.27) we'll put our hands on freshly baked .NET Core 1.0 & ASP.NET Core 1.0. What can (should) we expect of this new version? How will tomorrow (& days after) differ from what we already know? Microsoft is honestly open about all the technical changes (well, what can you expect - it's all OSS now), so I'll skip them - you can easily catch up using tons of on-line tutorials & blog posts if you're interested in the new tooling, deployment methods, even benchmarks. I'd rather focus on…

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Azure Service Fabric: how to weave services in hyper-scale

Azure Service Fabric: how to weave services in hyper-scale

All right, as it's already official now ... Sebastian Gębski @liveweird na ścieżce #dotnet! Opowie o Azure Service Fabric - jak tkać usługi w hiper-skali. pic.twitter.com/bfUDnUZA0E— 4Developers (@4Developers) February 4, 2016 ... let me personally invite you all to my session: Title: Azure Service Fabric: how to weave services in hyper-scale Description: In November 2015 Microsoft shared an initial version (Public Preview) of their new cloud services platform named Azure Service Fabric. Such an announcement ain't necessarily a reason for immediate excessive excitement ..., but if you reinforce it with few additional facts, e.g.: Service Fabric works already…

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Easy Rider?

Easy Rider?

After a bit of pre-conf hype building ... We'll be revealing Project Rider at NDC London. Wednesday 13th January 2016 https://t.co/ydglHEkRZa #jetbrainsRider— Project Rider (@JetBrainsRider) January 11, 2016 ... the 1st day of NDC conference in London has brought a very interesting .NET-related announcement from JetBrains - the company is working on a new product - cross-platform, IntelliJ-based IDE for .NET, powered by ReSharper guts. Current code name: Project Rider. NDC's orgs were blazing fast with publishing the announcement session, so it's already available on-line: If you're not have spare 40 mins, official JetBrains blog post…

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Microsoft's moment of truth

Microsoft's moment of truth

The waiting is over. Army is assembled and in the field already. Facing enemies that are stronger then ever, already entrenched & most likely packed with surprises. The forthcoming battle may answer a very important question - is there still a place for Microsoft in post-PC era? A significant one? The counter attack It's very clearly visible that Microsoft has learned a lot & change a lot since Satya Nadella took over the CEO chair. It seems they've realized that their platforms' declining market share is due to: failing in attracting the developers ignoring the voice of community (perceived as…

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New era of the .NET Platform? Mark today's date

I had a completely different idea for today's blog post (ok, to be honest, I always have a few "almost-ready" blog posts waiting in queue to be published), but today's events have forced me to change the priorities. What has happened today? VSConnect happened. Microsoft has picked up today's date to make a few ground-shaking announcements (use this tag to follow the communication stream on Twitter) about their custom development platform: you can find the most important points here, but let me rephrase them with some comments: Open sourcing .NET Core runtime & libraries - yes, it doesn't…

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ApprovalTests for .NET - seems crazy, but there's a point...

To be honest, I haven't heard about ApprovalTests library until just few days ago, when I've spotted a new course on Pluralsight - Approval Tests for .NET. But the concept seems interesting enough to catch my restless attention for a moment, so here comes the blog post ... So, what's AT about? AT aims to replace typical asserts in automated tests with somoething more clear, transparent & human readable. A test that uses AT: Performs some short scenario Dumps the results (serializes in any way you prefer ...) Compares whether the results are different to what you've "recorded" during the…

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Stuff I've found on the web: exception handling policy lib - Polly

I have a weak spot for the policy design pattern since ol' good C++ times: I think it has all started when I've read one of Sutter's / Alexandrescu's books with some great examples of policies injected via template parameters. This way you could get a variable behavior without complex inheritance and excessive coupling. Today, the times of templates are long gone (trust me: C# generics are 5% of what was possible with C++ templates ...), but it doesn't mean you can't use strategy / policy design patterns anymore. Back to business: The star of the day is named "Polly". Polly…

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