TypeScript has silently won the web development

TypeScript has silently won the web development

Roughly 10 months ago I've written about the way Babel.js (& ES6) has changed web development in such a short time. Let me remind you just my final conclusion: You don't have to wait anymore, there's really no reason to postpone adapting Babel/ES6 in your current development. But that was 10 months ago & ... situation has developed in an interesting way since then. No-one seems to care about new framework hype-trains anymore - the most interesting (& widely commented) improvements affect the language (JavaScript) itself: JSX, Flow & ... (vacuumed & improved :>) TypeScript. When there was no hope…

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Fat is not dead. Sort of.

Fat is not dead. Sort of.

JS, JS, JS everywhere JavaScript is the language of the web - we all have heard that many times. It has a variety of potential usages in various (sometimes not obvious) scenarios - even server-side ones - but there was a category of applications I could not imagine JS in - thick (desktop) clients. However, recently I've encountered two projects that have made me reconsider this opinion. What's interesting, they both use a very similar approach & both have already made a lot of noise around. Thick client, where art thou? But before we delve into actual projects - who…

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Web for the impatient - using the language of the future

Web for the impatient - using the language of the future

JavaScript (& the descendants of so-called traditional web stack) is everywhere. In browsers, on mobile, on low-energy tech (IoT) even on the server-side. Regardless of its flaws & limitations, it didn't succumb - quite the opposite - it's evolving & what's more interesting, it's forking in so many directions that it's quite hard to comprehend, if you want to remain up-to-date. I've already written about Dart, TypeScript, Polymer, NodeJS/io.js - but today I'll focus on the future of JavaScript (well... ECMAScript - hopefully you get the difference) itself & ... the fact that it's already here. Harmony As we…

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Browserify - the tiny gem that makes a difference

So, you've got a lot of JavaScript code and you've decided to give it some structure - extract & encapsulate modules, set up some dependencies. Most likely you've seen require.js already (or some kind of equivalent) and you love it. It works just fine as long as you're dealing with a homegrown hobbyst Proof-of-Concept fiddling & juggling. But once you're about to release your stuff to the wider audience, you'd like to make sure that it's really efficient (in terms of both response size and quantity) and expected (I keep fingers crossed) hype about your product won't DDoS it…

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I sense the storm coming, WebStorm it is. WebStorm 8.0

WebStorm 8.0 (http://www.jetbrains.com/webstorm/) is already here - it was officially released on 26.03.2014. The latest version of the best IDE for web devs brings some neat improvements. I'm still learning these, but to be frank - I already love most of the things I've found so far :) First things first: The feature I was especially waiting for - smooth Spy-JS integration. If you haven't heard about Spy-JS, check one of my archive posts or go straight to its website: http://spy-js.com/. The short version for the impatient, thanks to Spy-JS you can:…

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Protractor - the PR0 way to do E2E tests for Angular.js

Why do we do SPAs (Single Page Applications)? For glory, gold and girls! Yea, sure, in the end it’s all of those things, BUT what are the low level, basic, crude and atomic reasons? There are few: because we don’t like to mix server tech with client-side tech because we want to truly separate presentation from business logic because we desire our front-end being TESTABLE Yes, SPAs are more testable than traditional approach to server-generated web apps. Same applies to my beloved angular.js - it supports automated testing by design and it promotes two different…

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