Today I have for you some shorts about stuff I’ve recently found interesting, amusing or worth considering.

  1. Telerik (http://www.telerik.com) has announced its solution for cross-platform mobile development - Icenium (http://www.icenium.com/). Whether we like it or not, mobile is quickly becoming a very serious market for app development and cross-platforms solutions help greatly with decreasing the cost of application development. Icenium is based on HTML5, CSS and JavaScript and it targets both Apple iOS and Google Android. You can get some idea about what’s it capable of here: http://docs.icenium.com/example-apps-and-code-snippets/apps/apps. Anyway, I still agree with Martin Fowler’s opinion on cross-platform approach to mobile (you can find it in one of my past posts).
  2. Kelly Sommers has made a very interesting blog post (http://kellabyte.com/2012/10/20/clarifying-amqp/) about the changes introduced in AMQP 1.0. AMQP is a successor of XMPP and seems to be becoming the most important MOM (Message Oriented Middleware) protocol these days (implemented by - among others - RabbitMQ, StormMQ, Apache Qpid). The changes between 0.9.1 and 1.0 are really fundamental (and may cause more implementation fragmentation).
  3. During last few weeks I’ve had some considerations regarding e-mail as a carrier of information. In general, it’s awesome, because:
    • it’s disconnected (you don’t have to sync with other person in time to communicate via mail)
    • it’s persistent (you can back yourself up with past e-mails, when needed)
    • as a written form, it helps to structure the message (at least in my case)
    • something what was written once, can be redistributed to another recipients later (so you don’t have to repeat it)
          But … every moon has its dark side as well:
    • I think I have some kind of gift for writing (to be more precise - to structure the information in clear and tidy written way) - but still, if the reader is not putting enough effort in reading and understanding the message, he’s missing the point AND IT’S HARDLY VERIFIABLE
    • Writing e-mails takes helluva of time (when compared to direct speaking)
    • When speaking to someone directly and aiding myself with freeform drawing on a scrap of paper, it is much faster and easier to express the same message than to write an e-mail (but it’s not permanent, so it may happen that the recipient will forget it or “twist it” in some time!)
So, as time gets more and more critical for me these days, I’ve decided to follow that site’s suggestion - five.sentenc.es (http://five.sentenc.es/) If you have the same problem, you should check this link. Don’t be a slave of your mailbox, don’t book meeting time for reading / writing e-mails.